Tag Archives: brain aneurysm

Penn State Hershey Treats 1,000th Gamma Knife Patient

Leksell Gamma Knife® Perfexion™Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center recently completed its 1,000th Gamma Knife radiosurgery procedure. Gamma Knife radiosurgery uses a single dose of radiation instead of a surgeon’s scalpel to treat a wide range of diseases, including both benign and malignant tumors, Parkinson’s disease, vascular malformations and lesions that cause epilepsy.

Penn State Hershey’s 1,000th Gamma Knife patient was Robert Reynolds from Mifflintown, Juniata County. Reynolds was treated for lung cancer that had spread to his brain. Since undergoing the procedure, Reynolds has returned to work as a Juniata County commissioner.

“We were able to treat five lesions in Mr. Reynolds’ brain,” said Dr. Jonas Sheehan, director of neuro-oncology at Penn State Hershey. “His case is a great example of how our experienced neurosurgeons and radiation oncologists are able to provide advanced care that allows patients with complex conditions to enjoy a high quality of life.” Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Pipeline Embolic Device for the treatment of complex aneurysms

Pipeline EmbolicPenn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center is one of the first hospitals in the area to use a new, minimally invasive tool to treat brain aneurysms and prevent stroke. The Pipeline Embolic Device (PED) is part of a new class of devices called flow-diverters, which treat brain aneurysms in an endovascular fashion, without the need to access the aneurysm itself.

Brain aneurysms are typically sack-like out-pouchings that arise from cerebral arteries. A subarachnoid hemorrhage, the type of stroke that results when an aneurysm ruptures, is particularly devastating, carrying a 40-50 percent thirty-day mortality rate and leaving approximately one-third of the survivors disabled. The Pipeline Embolic Device is used to prevent such a stroke. The device, a mesh-like Nitinol tube—similar to a stent—is placed in the parent artery across the base of the aneurysm outpouching. Over time, blood flow into the aneurysm is reduced, or diverted, allowing the aneurysm to clot off. The clotting prevents the aneurysm from rupturing, and eventually leads to shrinkage of the aneurysm. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized