Tag Archives: restless leg syndrome

Researchers Study Biomarkers in Patients with Restless Legs Syndrome

Idiopathic restless legs syndrome (RLS) can severely affect quality of life and disturb sleep, often requiring pharmacological treatment.¹ According to Max Lowden, M.D., clinical director, Penn State Hershey Restless Legs Syndrome Clinic, RLS is also associated with a host of comorbidities considered more clinically severe than RLS alone. In this little-studied field, research into biomarkers is crucial.

Biomarkers in patients with restless leg syndromeAssistant Professor of Neurosurgery Stephanie Patton, Ph.D., received a grant from the Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation in 2012 to conduct a study entitled, “The role that the nitric oxide pathway plays in regulating vasodilation of the legs in restless legs syndrome.”² The study sought to determine whether changes in blood flow occurred in the femoral artery of RLS subjects, and if hypoxia attenuated the increased blood flow response in RLS patients compared to subjects without the condition. The goal was to identify additional mechanistic pathways in RLS, and potentially develop novel diagnostic and treatment strategies.² Continue reading

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Additional RLS Research Examines Iron Deficiency

James R. Connor, Ph.D., vice-chair of neurosurgery at Penn State Hershey Medical Center, has been continuing research that began as a collaboration with scientists at The Johns Hopkins Hospital over a decade ago. These prior autopsy studies indicated the brain is iron-deficient in RLS patients, and proved a biological basis for the condition, as patients had a low ferritin level in common. This iron deficiency has multiple consequences that will provide further insights into therapeutic targets. “One of these consequences is the activation of hypoxic pathways, since there is not enough iron to use the oxygen,” says Connor. “This is clearly related to reduced peripheral blood flow.” In combination with the research being conducted by Dr. Stephanie Patton, this information may deepen the scientific and clinical knowledge of a poorly-understood condition and open multiple doors to future treatment options.


James R. Connor, Ph.D.James R. Connor, Ph.D.
Distinguished Professor of Neurosurgery, Neural and Behavioral Sciences and Pediatrics
Vice-Chair of Neurosurgery
PHONE:
717-531-4541
E-MAIL:
jconnor@hmc.psu.edu
POSTGRADUATE STUDY:
University of California, Berkeley, Calif.
POSTDOCTORAL TRAINING:
Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Mass.


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